Connect with us

Styyle Interview with Muzique Magazine

Styyle Interview with Muzique Magazine
  • Save

INDIE SPOT

Styyle Interview with Muzique Magazine

Styyle Interview with Muzique Magazine
  • Save

Styyle Interview with Muzique Magazine

How did you come by your stage name?

Well, my real name is Crystyle pronounced (Chris Style) so everybody started calling me Styyle when I was a teen. It sounded good and made it easier for me to use it as my artist name because it was authentic. The name Styyle applies to so much from fashion to music I thought it would work well no matter what I did.

When did you discover your love for your craft and what made you realize you wanted to pursue a career in it?

I have been loving music for as long as I can remember but I started wanting to pursue it once I gained the confidence to do it around people that gave me the courage to actually make music. In the beginning, I wanted to create but there were so many talented artists in my area I didn’t feel like there was room for me. Once I developed my own Style I realized that being yourself is the key to being unique. I started making the music that I wanted to make and I was surprised people liked the angle from which I approached my music. I want my music to tell my story but I also want to keep people hype and energized with positive vibes sometimes. There are other times I want people to listen to my music and reflect on their own lives and situations. I love music because I love the ability to make the audience feel things.

To what or whom do you accredit your sense of style?

Myself mainly because I’m unique. I won’t say I don’t have influences though. If I had to choose my biggest influences I would say Lil Uzi Vert or Gucci Mane just because of their style and the way their music speaks for a whole generation from one extreme to the next.

On your current project, how did you come up with the concept?

Well, as the world has gone through so many changes facing tragedy after the tragedy I lost my dad and my grandmother a few months apart. I feel like the Devil is trying to keep our spirits low and cause us to lose faith in our belief system and each other. My album addresses some of these issues without succumbing to them. I feel like all this is the devil trying to tear me down, he’s trying to tear us all down. When bad things surround you that are outside of your control that means you’re doing something right. I haven’t always done the right thing but as I started changing my thinking and my habits I noticed I was facing more obstacles but receiving more blessings. I went from a problem child to “The Devil’s Problem”. That’s a transition I’m proud of.

What are some of your greatest challenges, and what is your greatest attribute when it comes to your work ethic?

My greatest challenge is figuring out ways to perfect my craft and learn from what I’ve messed up on or didn’t succeed in and do better. My work ethic is pretty consistent and I would say my greatest attribute would be my unique style and passion for music. Taking that ethic and passion and channeling them into a career is a process. Music isn’t an easy career to get into. I’ve worked hard balancing my everyday life with my personal pursuits in music. My label helps me with that and so do my friends and family. My challenge is making sure my impact is large enough that we all benefit: me for my hard work and them for their faith in me.

Are you the best at what you do in your opinion?

No, because I feel like with anything you do there is always someone better than you. To be considered the best you have to have something to show more than others. I feel “eventually” people will be able to look at my total body of work and put me in the conversations about the “best” artist. Right now I’m in the beginning phases of my career and I feel like I’ve been blessed enough to go further than some of my peers and at the same time I’m still striving to reach new heights. It’s not time for me to worry about who’s the best rapper. I’m still working on being the best Crystyle.

What are your plans for the near future?

My plans are to continue to release music and reach for better opportunities. I’m at the phase of my career where the music quality is where it needs to be. I have a regular fan base and have generated interest in my music. My team and I have plans to push these elements and attract more of a following by consistently releasing music. Every day I’m learning new ways to promote and market myself and my team. Being a part of indie like Powerseat Music Group means that, as an artist, you have to get your hands dirty. It’s a long road with more work but I believe anything worth having is worth working towards. My plans are to dedicate myself to that work.

Is there anyone you’d like to thank, any shout-outs?

My team, my child, and supportive family and friends in my life.

How can fans find you?


Instagram @Styylez_3
Instagram @powerseatmusicgroup

What suggestions do you have for other artists like yourself?

Keep grinding, don’t let anybody tell you that hard work doesn’t pay off, because eventually, it does whether it’s sooner or later.

Continue Reading

Founder & Editor-In-Chief of Muzique Magazine Alfred Munoz, is an American Army Veteran, Entrepreneur, and Talent Manager with over 20 years of experience in the Music industry, Leadership, Management, and Branding.

More in INDIE SPOT

Advertisement Shop now at Columbia.com!
Advertisement Vrbo
Advertisement Ray-Ban - Shop Online
Advertisement OPG_Fall2020_300x600
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement Shop the Oakley New Arrivals!
To Top
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap